Monthly Archives: April 2011

Responsible Driving : Think Before You Speak

Distracted Driving, commonly known to us as “texting or talking while driving” is a major factor causing accidents on road. Use of hand-held mobile phones while driving is banned in Japan and New York State since 1999 and 2001 respectively. ‘Distracted Driving’ must become totally uncool and socially unacceptable like drunk driving especially among teenagers. Here is an insightful article which throws light on the steps taken to prevent ‘Distracted Driving’. Click here: http://econ.st/gffvPW to read.

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Practice Safety on Roads, Enjoy Safe Tea at Home!


Ambitious, astute, competitive, hard working, and tech-savvy – some adjectives that well describe this day and age. People of all ages today can be described thus, and future generations will only be more so.

This competitive society compels you to strive to be exclusive, adaptive and the ‘best’ in every walk of life. One who displays these dynamics, is defined as successful. One competes for getting the best job, at the best company, with the best designation…all the way to getting the best clothes, cars and gadgets. ‘Best’ is a superlative that people try to achieve for their happiness, and that of their loved ones. It is this ‘best’ that helps us secure the future of our families.

The roots behind this ‘best’ remain the basic instincts of security and safety. Hence, the boom of insurance – financial insurance, medical insurance, property insurances, etc. The bad news, however, is that minor facets of our daily routine, which call for utmost care, cannot be insured. Road safety is perhaps the best example of this. One reckless driver is a danger to all on the road, including his own. The big question is, are we conscious of our families and their future when we drive?

Sure, your car insurance will get you the cash for another vehicle. But will your life insurance get your life back?A rough day at work does not permit you to endanger valuable lives, since it is, after all, your family you work hard for. And they deserve your coming home after a long day, and sharing your life with them.

Blessed as you are to have loved ones, take an oath today to buckle your seat belts, switch off your mobile phones and follow traffic rules when you drive. Practice them, and ensure safety in this city full of hustle-bustle…ensure the the smiles of your loved ones. Remember, hard work pays off, only when you can share it with your them.

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Innovative methods for road traffic management

Urbanization comes with a cost and terrible traffic is just one of them. Our times strongly call for an innovative plan for traffic management, but at cost effective rates. Road traffic management mainly involves a smooth flow of traffic and avoidance of accidents. Maintaining discipline on the roads is the end view.

The primary methods used to achieve road discipline are traffic signal control, traffic monitoring, and access management. These methods are more effective, when combined with innovative but simple traffic management techniques.

In populated areas, opportunities to build up access points and remove underused signals are plenty and should not be overlooked. If an area is under a redevelopment project, traffic flow should be managed by creating turn-lanes, service roads, etc. in co-ordination with property owners and developers.

The volume of traffic has increased manifold over the last decade. Traffic management devices like traffic lights and signs quickly become obsolete, leading to congestion and chaos. These devices should be upgraded from time to time, after a thorough analysis of the traffic situation.

Today’s traffic management techniques are driven largely by developments in engineering and technology. Not only is the installation of sophisticated traffic management systems costly, but also require a higher level of maintenance. However, effective management systems can be made affordable, with effective and careful budgeting. Also, traffic management centers can be operated jointly by the government and private sector contractors, who can provide maintenance at reduced costs.

Besides the implementation of technological advances, a few basic rules should be made mandatory in every city/town. One of the elementary methods of bringing down accidents by at least 85% is the strict enforcement of speed limits. For reckless driving and over-speeding, heavy penalties should be imposed. But for the effective implementation of this rule, co-operation and honesty by the Road Traffic Officers is fundamental. Installation of tamper proof speed controllers for all heavy vehicles can also be helpful. Children, below a certain age, should be prohibited from cycling on busy roads, where heavy vehicles are plying. Safety awareness should be made a mandatory part of the academic curriculum in primary schools. If safety awareness is imparted during childhood, it is likely to be followed throughout adult life.

Charles M. Hayes rightly said “Safety First” is “Safety Always.” These words should be the guiding motto for the citizens of the country and it should be borne in mind that road safety is not only necessary for the individual, but also for the society on the whole.

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Steps taken in other countries for effective traffic management – Part 2

With rapid development and proliferation of technology, there has been an equally massive surge in urbanization. According to a number of researches, in the year 2007, for the first time in history, the majority of human population, the world over, lived in cities. This is certainly a massive landmark, and yet, urbanization is happening just as strongly.

Most of the population in cities drives cars, and their number is only expected to rise. Sadly enough, this has also led to an increase in road accidents, and the injuries and deaths they cause. This is a situation which calls for immediate, effective solutions. We must ask the question, “Can our transportation infrastructure and management approaches handle this rise?”

To this end, globally, officials are implementing changes in Road Safety Management. Let’s continue our investigations of some of the more effective ones:

In Stockholm, a dynamic toll system has played a vital role in controlling the flow of vehicles into the city. It has reduced traffic by 20%, decreased wait time by 25%, and cut emissions by 12%.

In Singapore, sensors are installed to measure and predict traffic scenarios, with 90% accuracy.

In Kyoto, city planners study huge traffic situations, involving thousands vehicles, to analyze the impact of urbanization.

In Bangkok, during certain hours of the day, the direction of the traffic on many one-way roads is changed.

Manila has a rather peculiar way controlling traffic. In heavy traffic, vehicles with number plates ending with the numbers 1 and 2 are forbidden from operating on city roads on Mondays, between 7 am and 7 pm, to reduce traffic jams.

Bermuda has gone ahead – imposing similar bans on rental cars.

The Romanians have been very proactive. Logic dictates that in the time-gap in which the accident takes place and the paramedics arrive, a lot can be lost. The Romanian Red Cross, a partner of the Global Road Safety Partnership, addressed this issue by training people on first-aid. The goal is to compliment the efforts of the paramedics, and boost the chances of survival of accident victims.

Remember the walking cars of The Flintstones? Sure you do! The concept exists even today. Students in South Africa get on a ‘Walking’ school bus, and walk in pairs behind an adult driver who directs the route between home and school. Physical fitness, clean and pollution free environment, and strong community relations are only few of the pros of this age-old concept.

If one country uses buses without wheels, another changes the name of its town to promote road safety. Strange but true – a town in Australia, named Speed, decided to modify its name to Speed Kills, to promote road safety. On Facebook, a campaign was launched for the name change, and it was decided that if the campaign received at least 10,000 ‘Like’s, the town would be renamed. It achieved over 33,000.

In conclusion, we can say that effective urbanization needs at its heart an effective transportation system. This increases the emphasis that must be laid on road safety. Let us work towards not just getting better roads from point ‘A’ to point ‘B’, but making sure we can travel those roads safely. ‘Smart’ traffic systems can be the key to reaching this goal, but, in reality, it will be achieved only when individuals make efforts.

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Steps taken in other countries for effective traffic management – Part 1

An estimated 1.2 million die, and 50 million get injured, each year due to flaws in traffic and road management systems – and this is no less than a catastrophe! Road injuries were the ninth-leading cause of death the world over in 2004, and the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that, by 2020, they will be “the third highest threat to public life.” If proven true, they will be a threat more serious and dangerous than HIV/AIDS. As such, it has become the need of the hour to implement a more systematic approach to traffic – Road Traffic Management. Firstly, we must recognize the importance of regulating public transport and road traffic. Once key areas are identified, effective measures must be swiftly taken towards the implementation of the plan. By observing the road safety practices of other countries, we can better realize our needs, and identify the measures, that need to be taken with some immediacy:

Europe’s Road Safety Days: Every country has its unique design of traffic management, suitable to its roads and vehicles. In the UK, Malta, Ireland, etc. traffic mainly drives on the left, whereas it is largely the other way round in the rest of Europe. The continent practices ‘Europe’s Road Safety Days’ – a great opportunity to work towards road safety, with many of the youth actively participating, by targeting themes such as alcohol, drugs and education. The first European Road Safety Day was celebrated on 27th April, 2007 – in tandem with the United Nations’ Global Road Safety Week, being commemorated from the 23rd to the 29th of April of the same year.

New York City institutes infrastructure for pedestrians: USA’s safest city is a threat to pedestrians, and research points out that it urgently requires better infrastructure for their safety. To this end, pedestrian countdown signals are being installed, and some busy street are being re-engineered.

England’s town has no traffic lights!: The English town of Portishead, about 120 miles west of London, had an interesting experiment. They turned off the traffic lights on a major road in September, 2009. The four-week study, to solve long-standing congestion at the junction, was not only unique, but also successful. In the trial period, roads were monitored using cameras to see the impact switched-off traffic signals would have on congestion. It turned out that drivers were forced to pay more attention to other vehicles, and pedestrians. And, obviously enough, there were considerable savings on the maintenance of traffic lights.

Kenya says, “Rewards for speeding!”: Nairobi, working closely with the Kenya Red Cross, carried out a radically distinctive workshop for road safety. They said, “Wear a helmet, and speed!” This brought into focus new revelations on specific risks associated with speeding. Techniques are now being developed to counter them.

To conclude, it can be said that innovative techniques of Road Traffic Management maybe easier to implement and more effective. Accidents are rising at an alarming rate, and, more than anything, it is the citizens’ awareness, and active participation, that will help curb the menace. “Precaution is better than cure” is a commonly-used adage, but the question that arises is, “How often do you practice it?”

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